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self love in recovery

Posted by on 8:50 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on self love in recovery

self love in recovery

Common Bond Rehab Center INC. Valencia, Ca. Finding Self Love in Recovery   We live in a world of wrong and right, positive or negative. Even if forgiveness is there and we get back on the right path there is still a lot of guilt and shame that goes along with relapse.   Even though one might feel despair and depressed, no one is walking around pointing fingers, yet it’s our own self-belief of ourselves.   One perspective is that our souls are to grow and learn so we can live our lives as a journey into our own self being.  We are only human and we have to face our own recovery, while loving ourselves in the mean time. The most important thing regarding recovery, is to take responsibility for our own actions.  We need to be aware of how we talk and treat ourselves. Treating ourselves is one of the greatest gifts available through our own freewill.  The biggest part of recovery is to admit that it is up to you to heal, and to heal with others.  I know it can be very scary for addicts to be real and compassion to themselves, which can make you feel vulnerable. One might say, I hate who I am and who I’ve become. Doing the deeper work to heal within ourselves and believing that we can love ourselves, is the biggest reward yet.  Self-Love is not contingent on what we are doing, instead it is a simple fact that we are worthy because our souls are very precious.  So, as you can see, being kind to ourselves, doesn’t mean we sweep it under the rug, we still must do our work and stop having negative self-talk and loathing.  Be honest with oneself and take a stand on your own love.  It takes more courage to examine our beliefs than it does to carry them.  Bravely walk forward despite fear and take the time to reflect honestly, we are showing ourselves...

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Embracing Positivity in Recovery

Posted by on 9:49 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Embracing Positivity in Recovery

Embracing Positivity in Recovery

                    Common Bond Rehab Center Inc. Saugus, Ca.                    Embracing Positivity in Recovery Have you ever wondered how many thoughts we have in a single day? Many researchers state that we have 40,000 to 60,000 thoughts per day .That’s a huge amount of information that passes through the grey matter of our brain. It’s safe to say that most of our thoughts are the ones that cause grief and the negative thoughts that cause our minds to not stay focused.  It’s no wonder why we feel like we have been hit by a truck. Our negative thoughts drain our energy and break us down.  We start to feel depressed, anger, frustrated and hopelessness, while trying to stay sober.  When we speak of positive recovery, you might already have the tools you need. You might have been taught the life skills that you need to stay focused. One way to increase our positive thoughts is through Mediation.  Meditation is a powerful tool that allows us to focus on our breathing, which helps us focus on here and now.  When practicing meditation regularly, any thoughts of the past and future can fall to the side, and you can place all your energy on what you can do right now to be happy. Let’s stop blaming others, and start managing our own life staying happy.  I’m sure you already know this, but you alone are the only one responsible for your own happiness.  This simple fact can be hard to realize because we want to blame others for our addiction.  Let’s stop blaming others and start managing our own life staying positive and focusing on a happy life being sober.  For Example:  Those with a more mindset to stay positive may become more receptive to treatment. They are willing to open up and heal for the addiction. Those who are more positive seem to take advantage of all tools and resources for a successful and healthy recovery....

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Stepping into the New Year and Staying Sober

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Stepping into the New Year and Staying Sober

Common Bond Rehab Center Inc. Saugus, Ca.       Stepping into the New Year and Staying Sober Celebrating the New Year comes with celebrating with champagne and other Alcoholic drinks.  And while celebrating the New Year, which usually goes through the early morning, can lead to unplanned and unhealthy decisions. It comes to no surprise that alcohol can lead to rising tempers, disagreements, driving under the influents , accidents, and other unwanted injuries. While embracing sobriety benefits can lead to positive first steps towards a fresh new start for the New Year. There are many aspects of your sobriety. While alcohol is a huge cost, just think if you’re not purchasing alcohol and or drugs, you can be free of spending your hard earned money on these products.  You finally have money for your rent, utilities, food and you’re now able to take care of yourself.  No more feeling terrible about your life.  You can focus on what makes you happy. Clearing your mind, you’ll also be healing your body, promoting better sleep, and enhancing energy. Also, the impact of Alcohol Memory can be alarming for most individuals. It can contribute to serious depression, anxiety, blackouts, memory loss, and other unhealthy conditions. So, participating in a recovery program, you can regain your control of your own life. You can enjoy the benefits of a clear mind.  While alcohol and drug use takes over your life, you can begin spending time with your family, friends, exercising, exploring new hobbies, and taking on new adventures.  The best thing to do during the holidays is to find a safe place to celebrate. There are many sober groups to make you feel right at home.  They are facing the same struggles, triggers and are trying to stay on the road to their own recovery. Since the New Year’s resolutions are often short lived, your sobriety is a lifelong benefit for a healthy life style.  There are plenty of ways to celebrate the New Year.  Stay home, relax and be around your loved ones who support your sobriety.  Also, there are plenty support groups that are available during the holidays.  So, if at home is not a safe place to be, you can plan a group time to go to one in your area to spend the New Year. Since you’re making a choice to quit drinking or using, this can be a wonderful benefit to your health, happiness, finances, relationships, career and much more.  So find out for yourself what a difference your life can be by staying sober, and trusting others and finding a place that is safe for your...

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stay sober through the holidays and helpful tips

Posted by on 8:35 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on stay sober through the holidays and helpful tips

stay sober through the holidays and helpful tips

Common Bond Rehab Center Inc. Valencia, Ca.      Stay Sober Through the Holidays and Helpful Tips “Whether you’re newly sober, years into recovery, or simply choosing to abstain from driving alcohol this season, navigating sobriety during a time where having a celebratory drink in a common place has its challenges, said Lawerence Weistein, Chief of Medical Officer of American Addiction Center.” Let’s take a look at how we can plan for a successful holiday season.  Here are some expert tips on how to enjoy the holidays being sober. Be Honest with You: Before committing to a holiday get together, let’s take a look at whether you are truly ready to handle being in an environment where people are socially drinking. When you’re newly sober, you have to be honest with yourself, it’s greatly important. Being healthy is extremely significant to your recovery.  If that means staying away from parties, bars or people that you might feel are a trigger, it might be worth making other plans that keep you safe. Bring a Sober Buddy: It’s great to bring a friend to parties, if you choose to go.  Friends can help you be sober and accountable for ones actions. Friends can be supportive, and help you enjoy yourself while being sober. Your Sobriety Matters: Put your sobriety first and realize that others might not understand at first but, this is your number one priority and this is what matters to you. 4 .Be Mindful of what you drink: The holidays are a huge social gathering place so; connecting with others might make the situation worse because everyone usually drinks alcohol.  It could be mindful to always have a beverage in hand, so other aren’t constantly offering you a drink.  It’s always wise to be responsible for your own beverage.  Don’t let others get you a drink, it is possible, it could be an alcoholic beverage.  You’ll be surprised how others will respect your wishes. All in all, the holidays can be rough even though it’s your first sober holiday, or your tenth sober holiday, just remain strong and always remember that the holidays are about love, family and togetherness.                         Common Bond Rehab Center Inc.Valencia,...

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Understanding Addiction and Mental Illness

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Understanding Addiction and Mental Illness

Common Bond Rehab Center, INC. Newhall, Ca. Understanding Addiction and Mental Illness Leading experts claim that addiction and substance abuse can mask many symptoms that under lye other conditions. Many people suffer from depression and anxiety for many years, which usually leads to attempts to self medicate. They are finding out through their recovery the correlation between addiction and mental health. What is Mental Illness? The American Psychiatric Association defines health conditions as involving change in thinking, emotions or behavior and sometimes a combination of all three. Mental illness is a combination of distress, problems functioning in family activities, social environment and functioning at work. The most common types of mental illness that individuals suffer from include: Anxiety, Depression Disorders, Seasonal Affection Disorders, Obsessive Compulsive Disorders, Bipolar Disorders, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders, Schizophrenia, Eating Disorders and Dementia. Therefore, anyone can suffer from mental illness. Although mental illnesses are most common in families with a diagnosed history of mental health issues, mental illness can be an onset during someone’s life at any time.  For Example: Their childhood, adolescences, adulthood and even as one gets older in age. Studies are stating that the most common ages are greater in percentage of mental health diagnoses, are between the ages of 18 and late 20’s.  Roughly 50 % of individuals with severe mental illnesses are affected by substance abuse. 37 % are alcohol abusers and 53 % are drug users. Within these percentages, at least one suffers from mental illness. On the contrary, out of all these percentages most individuals diagnosed with mental health issues reflect 29% rates who are alcoholics or drug users. In conclusion, while substance abuse and mental health suffers is on the rise, we can’t ignore these problems. In fact, if individuals aren’t able to seek advice and care for their addiction, attending special trained facilities, the individuals get worse.  It’s very important that individuals who suffer from substance abuse and mental illness are not alone. There are many avenues to get proper help for individuals, so they can receive an outstanding recovery plan. With many support groups, self help and adequate treatment centers available, individuals can conquer their demons, repair relationships, and focus on a healthy road to recovery. Common Bond Rehab Center, INC Newhall,...

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Why is Drug Addiction Considered a Disease?

Posted by on 10:26 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Why is Drug Addiction Considered a Disease?

Why is Drug Addiction Considered a Disease?

Common Bond Rehab Center INC. Stevenson Ranch Santa Clarita, Ca.                      Why is Drug Addiction Considered A Disease? The science behind drug addiction has come a long way within these past 20 years.  Growing prevalence of substance use disorder around the World.  Many people still want to believe that substance abuse affects only the weak willed, and most see it as a character flaw, instead of a disease, that stems from the brain. A disease is a medical condition that prevents the body from functioning normally.  For example: Diabetes, Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis and other chronic conditions. These have a huge impact on the individual who suffers from the disease, in which they have long-term effects within their daily lives.  Many diseases are “incurable” but people go through times of “remission”, addiction is no different. Individuals do struggle with their addiction on a daily basis; most will even relapse during their sobriety.  Just like any other disease, addiction is an ongoing process in which one should work on consciously to prevent a relapse. As we take a look at the function of the brain of an addict, we need to understand how Dopamine works in the human brain. In a normal functioning brain, we have levels of Dopamine, in which it is a neurotransmitter that allows us to seek basic pleasure. Examples include: resting, eating, enjoying the outdoors, which these all makes us feel good, and resulting in a release of Dopamine in our brain, pushing us to engage in behaviors that keep us happy.  While basic pleasures release Dopamine, so will unhealthy ones like using drugs.   Most often drugs can release much more quickly with a higher degree of Dopamine.  Examples Include: Using Opioids or other enormous euphoric rush of Dopamine in the brain, which is difficult to compare to any other natural source. To summarize, addiction involves many changes in the functioning of the brain and body. These changes often bring upon a habit of risky substance use which can lead to harmful or dangerous consequences .The consequences or untreated addiction often includes physical and mental health disorders, which usually leads to medical attention.  Untreated over time, addiction become more severe, disabling and life threatening Common Bond Rehab Center INC.  Stevenson Ranch Santa Clarita, Ca.  ...

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GUIDE TO OPIOIDS

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GUIDE TO OPIOIDS When they’re taken as prescribed, opioids can manage pain effectively. They can improve quality of life for people with chronic pain. In fact, using opioids under the proper supervision of a doctor rarely leads to addiction or dependence. However, when used long-term, opioids may lead to drug abuse with physical dependence and/or addiction. Prescription opioids can also be life threatening in an overdose as can heroin. When they are taken with substances that depress the central nervous system like alcohol, barbiturates, or benzodiazepines, there is a greatly increased risk of respiratory distress, and even death. In 2016 about 63,600 people died of drug overdoses in the U.S., most of them being from Opioids. Opioids are sometimes called narcotics. OPIOIDS VS OPIATES Generally speaking, an opiate is a drug made from the poppies of opium plants. These include codeine and morphine.  Opioids, heroin included, are synthetic versions of this.  The addiction treatment community has settled on “opioid” as the umbrella term for opioids and opiates both. Virtually all opioids are legal by prescription except one. HEROIN Not surprisingly, heroin is considered by most measures to be the world’s most addictive drug.  Heroin use in America continues to increase at a frightening rate.  Twice as many Americans used heroin in 2012 as did in 2007 and those numbers are rising.    In 2014, about 11,000 persons died of heroin overdoses. Fatal overdoses involving heroin skyrocketed from 8% in 2010 to 25% in 2015 — essentially tripling. Heroin’s extreme danger can be shown in some key areas. Its street value is cheap. Its withdrawal is brutal, and relapse often seems guaranteed. EFFECTS of heroin intoxication include drowsiness, pleasure, and slowed breathing. Withdrawal can be intense and can include vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, confusion, aches, and sweating. COMPLICATIONS from heroin are many, mainly because it is usually injected, often with dirty needles. Use of the drug can trigger other health complications including destruction of the heart valves, HIV/AIDS, infections, tetanus, botulism, and hepatitis B and C. OVERDOSE symptoms from heroin include:  bluish nails or lips, depressed breathing, weak pulse, pinpoint pupils, disorientation/delirium, extreme drowsiness, loss of consciousness, coma. RELAPSE rates for heroin are very high.  Some estimates suggest as high as 90% after 3 months without recovery treatment, and 50% with such treatment. PRESCRIPTION OPIOIDS 40% of all opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid. Four times more prescriptions were written for opioid painkillers in 2014 than in 1999 even though there is no evidence Americans are suffering more physical pain. EFFECTS of medical opioid use include deadening of pain, controlling coughing and stopping diarrhea.  Non-medical use is meant by the user to drown emotional pain, get a rush, induce euphoria, and prevent withdrawal symptoms. OVERDOSE symptoms include: constipation, pinpoint pupils, nausea, vomiting, weak pulse, seizures, breathing problems, blue lips or finger nails, coma. RELAPSE rates and dangers are high in prescription opioid addictions, as they are in heroin.  A challenge to recovery is the high level of tolerance these medications induce.  Tolerance occurs when the person no longer responds to the drug as strongly as before, thus necessitating a higher dose to achieve the same effect as before the recovery began. THE PRESCRIPTION OPIOIDS Opioids act by attaching to specific proteins called opioid receptors, which are found in the brain, spinal cord, gastrointestinal tract, and other...

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GUIDE TO COCAINE

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GUIDE TO COCAINE If you hear the term “dope fiend” you’re probably hearing about cocaine.  The phrase came into being many years ago to describe the nasty and sometimes deadly side-effects of constant cocaine use.  Coke, blow, line, rail, snow, big C, powder, stash and bump, are all street names to describe a drug extracted from coca leaves and worth tens of billions of dollars worldwide.  Euphoric, energetic and alert are among feelings users report.  The high is described as intense, but also short-lived.  It’s a feeling that can quickly descend into depression and edginess and, eventually, a powerful craving for more. USAGE Cocaine comes in two forms; cocaine hydrochloride, which is white crystalline powder, or crack, which is hydrochloride processed with ammonia or baking soda and water to create crystal chips, chunks or rocks.  Powdered cocaine is typically snorted, but can also be dissolved in water and injected.  Crack is typically heated to a vapor and smoked.  Shooting or smoking cocaine produces a quicker and stronger high, lasting 5-10 minutes.  But in snorting it the high will last 15-30 minutes.  Because of these short bursts of pleasure, users want more and more, creating a binge pattern in increasingly high doses.  This pattern of use goes a long way toward explaining the highly addictive nature of cocaine. HOW DOES IT WORK Cocaine is a powerful central nervous system stimulant that increases the levels of dopamine in the brain.  It is dopamine that regulates pleasure.  When levels of dopamine run amok, triggered by cocaine, a high is created, one that can quickly lead to addiction. LONG-TERM EFFECTS Cocaine use, even short-term, can wreak havoc on both body and mind.  It constricts blood vessels, dilates pupils and increases body temperatures.  Heart rates and blood pressures rise.  Headaches and abdominal troubles occur.  When usage becomes chronic, appetite is lost leading to malnourishment.  Sleep becomes deprived.  Heart attacks, enlarged hearts, strokes and respiratory failure can bring death.  The brain’s rewards system is compromised.  Tolerance levels become so high some users can never again get the same high they tasted when they first started.  Doses increase to the point of permanent adverse psychological or physiological effects.  Those who snort it might lose their sense of smell, develop nosebleeds, problems swallowing or constant runny noses.  Those who inject risk HIV, hepatitis C, or other blood-borne diseases. For binge users paranoia, anxiety, irritability, anger and hostility can become constants and, for some, there are hallucinations and even full-blown psychosis. MIXING AND OVERDOSE As is the case with other drugs, the number of fatal overdoses involving cocaine has risen alarmingly in recent years.  Signs of cocaine overdose include rapid heartbeat, agitation and fever.  Seizures may occur as may heart attacks.  Significant numbers of overdoses involving cocaine are the result of mixing with other drugs or alcohol.  The combination of cocaine and heroin—speedball—is especially dangerous.  This combination slows down the respiratory system, sometimes to a full stop and death. DETOX Cocaine is extremely addictive and very hard to kick.  The withdrawal from cocaine is not so much physical, as is the case with heroin and alcohol, but psychological.  The problem with cocaine is the powerful craving that can exist for days, weeks and even months.  There is no specific medication dedicated to easing withdrawal or craving for cocaine...

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RELAPSE AND THE LOVED ONES

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 How to Respond When someone you care about gets clean and sober it’s awesome. There may be hallelujahs sung, joy filling the air, and relief from us friends and family who’d all thought we’d seen enough. But all too often reality rears its ugly head in the form of a potentially devastating and heart breaking relapse. Anger and disappointment are hard to avoid. But for those struggling with a loved one in addiction, it’s crucial to remember, all may not be lost. For the most part, say the experts, relapse should be considered a part of the recovery process. While all of our reactions and situations may be different, it’s important to be prepared in the likely event that a relapse occurs. Here are four things to remember as you help support your loved one through a relapse. 1. Be Supportive. Being supportive during a relapse might not mean what you think. A relapse is not a positive thing, but it can be a learning experience with the right mindset. So while you shouldn’t condone the act of drinking or using again, recast the event into one of encouragement; sticking with the plan, no matter how hard it might be. As disappointed as you might be in the relapse, imagine how your loved one feels. Encourage them not to look at recovery as an “all or nothing” approach, knowing there will be bad days and good days. What’s important is that they stay committed to the process. Remind them of the healthy changes seen in their life and that a relapse doesn’t have to mean a long-term return to using. You aren’t responsible for how they respond to this information, but supporting them in the way of recovery might give them another reason to stick with it. 2. Talk it Out. As a support person, you have a right to be honest, upset or disappointed. Your feelings and concerns might vary depending on the situation or your loved one’s history with addiction, but it’s important to be honest. You might have an easier time expressing your concerns in a counseling session or with a third party who is safe and neutral. No matter how you choose to express yourself, it’s important to remember that emotions are okay – and its fine if you have them. As your loved one works to come back from a relapse, modeling healthy behavior, emotion and honesty will help set an example. No matter what happens, you won’t be carrying the weight of the relapse on your shoulders and, instead, you’ll be living transparently and honestly to the best of your ability. 3. Keep That Fence Up. The importance of boundaries in addiction and recovery can never be overstated. It’s important to realize that being supportive of your loved one doesn’t mean you need to ignore or normalize a relapse. As you show support and honesty towards your loved one, consider if it’s time to put up boundaries. Whether this means distancing yourself for a period of time or avoiding certain conversations, topics or situations with your loved one, you’re free to make the decisions you need to make to stay healthy and resilient. 4. There’s Help. Use it. Your loved one shouldn’t have to deal with a relapse on their own—and neither should...

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